Welcome to the Effective Practice Section of the website.

Effective treatment of people who are at risk to sexually offend as well as those who have sexually offended is key to preventing future victimization and making society safer. ATSA supports the use of research-based and evidence-informed treatment known to reduce the likelihood of someone sexually offending. ATSA encourages those involved in addressing the problem of sexual abuse to adopt practices consistent with the best available evidence, and to adapt their approaches as new research and data emerge.

The Practice Guidelines for the Assessment, Treatment, and Management of Male Adult Sexual Abusers, also known by the short title ATSA Adult Practice Guidelines is available to ATSA Members as a PDF in the members only section.

Anyone can order the Practice Guidelines by completing the online order form. Both hard copy booklets and PDF versions are available through the order form.

Download the ATSA Adult Practice Guidelines table of contents.

The ATSA Practice Guidelines for Assessment, Treatment, and Intervention with Adolescents Who Have Engaged in Sexually Abusive Behavior, also known by the short title ATSA Adolescent Practice Guidelines is available to ATSA Members as a PDF in the members only section.

Anyone can order the Practice Guidelines by completing the online order form. Both hard copy booklets and PDF versions are available through the order form.

Download the ATSA Adolescent Practice Guidelines table of contents.

To download a free PDF copy of the Professional Code of Ethics and learn more please visit the ATSA Code of Ethics page.
To download and learn more about the Task Force on Children with Sexual Behavior Problem's Report click here.
The treatment of sexual offending behaviors is complex and involves multiple etiologies, individualized risk reduction and risk management needs, and heterogeneous biopsychosocial, interpersonal, and legal factors. Clinicians and researchers have attempted to identify approaches which promise the greatest success in addressing these behaviors. Findings from a meta-analysis examining the effectiveness of various treatment interventions for adult sex offenders indicated that, when used in combination with other treatment approaches, biological interventions like testosterone-lowering hormonal treatments may be linked to greater reductions in recidivism for some offenders than the use of psychosocial treatments alone (Losel and Schmucker, 2005). Other data, described below, suggest that non-hormonal psychotropic medications can also be effective supplements to standard therapeutic interventions for sex offenders as well. This document is designed to provide an overview of key issues pertaining to the use of hormonal and non-hormonal agents to reduce or inhibit sexual arousal and recidivism in some sexual offenders. Read More...

2018 Call for Abstracts